Tag Archives: reflection

Using ‘I’ – an autoethnography

For as long as I can remember, I was always told that the story isn’t about me.

In high school, my teachers would time and time again remind us that using ‘I’ in an essay or short story was almost like shooting ourselves in the foot. We were told that using ‘I’ lessened the value of the work and that the pure focus should always be about the research and the content.

Now here I am, in my final semester at University and I am finally being told that using ‘I’ isn’t such as bad thing. According to Ellis, authoethnography allows the researcher to “analyse personal experiences to understand cultural experience.”

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Godzilla, a visualisation of Japan in 1954

When I think of Ishiro Honda’s 1954 film, Godzilla, I immediately visualise images of destroyed Japanese towns, a fire-breathing monster and terrified people. The classic combination for a Sci-Fi Horror film.

Before today, I hadn’t watched any of the films under the Godzilla umbrella because I wasn’t allowed to watch it.

Godzilla (1954)

Growing up as a young ethnic-Australian girl in the late 1990s, my parents  Italian/ South American parents were strict in regards to what we watched. At the time our television screens were filled with Japanese manga and cartoons with slight undertones of violence and destruction.  My mum banned my brother and I from ever watching shows and films like Godzilla or Japanese manga or cartoons because there was too much violence for impressionable young children.

After watching Gojira, i’m glad I didn’t watch the film when I was younger.

Through the lens of the New Historian Literary Theory, Godzilla was created as a product of the historic events which it was created in. If I was to have watched the film when I was younger, all I would have seen was scenes of destruction and over-dramatised acting. I wouldn’t have appreciated the history and underlying themes that capture the culture’s struggle surrounding the events that took place around WWII.

The film was different to what I had expected. It deeply explored the effects of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombs which ravaged the Japanese towns causing years of after effects, contamination and radiation. It also played on the social anxieties surrounding the U.S atomic bomb of Castle Bravo which detonated in 1954,  the same year Godzilla was released.

Godzilla itself was a motif for the unstoppable effects that the atomic bombs continued to have on the Japanese population.

Upon watching the film, I came to notice the theme of Human vs. Self where the community (human) vs. Godzilla (self) . Godzilla is a representation of the persona that humanity has created with the intention to be the better version of humanity and take over, in turn causing destruction.

This draws parallels with Mary Shelly’s Frankenstein where the monster becomes a product of its creator. In this case, Godzilla is the product of humanity and its desire to have control. It plays with the idea of humanity tampering with technologies beyond their power so much so that they create a monster.

Frankenstein

 

This is accentuated by the films nior and its black and white nature. Godzilla seems to come out from the shadows in certain scenes where the lighting techniques added to the dramatisation of the film.

Overall, I really enjoyed the film and how it played with certain themes, issues within Japanese culture and history as well as advancements in science and technology.

This film presented the fears, struggles and lives of Japanese people who were forced to live with the effects after the war and radioactivity. Thus, it provides a window for western audiences to view these struggles through the film.


Sources:

Honda, I 1954, ‘Godzilla’

Mambrol, N  2016, ‘New Historianism,’ Literary Theory and Criticism Notes <https://literariness.wordpress.com/2016/10/16/new-historicism/&gt;

Shelly, M 1818, ‘Frankenstein’

 

 

My Blogging Reflection

Blogging over the past nine weeks has allowed me to create a deeper understanding of my sense of self. Initially, my blog was a place for un-related posts that I uploaded with no real thought of the audience’s perception of my work or even what each blog post meant. Before starting this class, my blog posts looked like tiny pieces of broken glass serving no greater purpose. During this blogging experience I have transformed my blogging style in an effort to glue the pieces of broken glass together with one key and common factor—the discovery of authorship. Now, my blog posts have become auto-ethnographical accounts that link each week’s topic to an element of my life, culture or past. This allowed me to blog as a researcher whilst also blogging for myself and identifying the key links between the two.

This nature of authorship was coined by Joel Bloch and Cathryn Crosby who’s work inspired me to transform my blogging practices into something valuable.

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Reflection

Upon setting up my artwork, I had problems with the scale of the paper compared to the allocated space. After discussing many different places to present the paper,  we decided that it would be best to leave it on the floor. This meant that I had to trim the edges to allow for people to walk around the room without ruining the artwork.

Overall,  I was really pleased to see the finished product( Both the painted butches paper and the video running) as the repetition and variation was really brought to life.

Week 4-In change comes new perspective

My vision for this assignment is to evoke an emotion. My life being made up of an unconventional family life and connection, what better story to communicate but that of my dad. My dad, Antonino Lombardo left Australia in 2005 to live in the Philippines after claiming bancrupsy. However, he hasn’t left his past behind but lives in both simultaneously.  Calling both Sydney and Manila home, he has found a new appreciation for both lifestyles ultimately creating a new outlook in life.

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