Category Archives: DIGITAL MEDIA

Using ‘I’ – an autoethnography

For as long as I can remember, I was always told that the story isn’t about me.

In high school, my teachers would time and time again remind us that using ‘I’ in an essay or short story was almost like shooting ourselves in the foot. We were told that using ‘I’ lessened the value of the work and that the pure focus should always be about the research and the content.

Now here I am, in my final semester at University and I am finally being told that using ‘I’ isn’t such as bad thing. According to Ellis, authoethnography allows the researcher to “analyse personal experiences to understand cultural experience.”

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Godzilla, a visualisation of Japan in 1954

When I think of Ishiro Honda’s 1954 film, Godzilla, I immediately visualise images of destroyed Japanese towns, a fire-breathing monster and terrified people. The classic combination for a Sci-Fi Horror film.

Before today, I hadn’t watched any of the films under the Godzilla umbrella because I wasn’t allowed to watch it.

Godzilla (1954)

Growing up as a young ethnic-Australian girl in the late 1990s, my parents  Italian/ South American parents were strict in regards to what we watched. At the time our television screens were filled with Japanese manga and cartoons with slight undertones of violence and destruction.  My mum banned my brother and I from ever watching shows and films like Godzilla or Japanese manga or cartoons because there was too much violence for impressionable young children.

After watching Gojira, i’m glad I didn’t watch the film when I was younger.

Through the lens of the New Historian Literary Theory, Godzilla was created as a product of the historic events which it was created in. If I was to have watched the film when I was younger, all I would have seen was scenes of destruction and over-dramatised acting. I wouldn’t have appreciated the history and underlying themes that capture the culture’s struggle surrounding the events that took place around WWII.

The film was different to what I had expected. It deeply explored the effects of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombs which ravaged the Japanese towns causing years of after effects, contamination and radiation. It also played on the social anxieties surrounding the U.S atomic bomb of Castle Bravo which detonated in 1954,  the same year Godzilla was released.

Godzilla itself was a motif for the unstoppable effects that the atomic bombs continued to have on the Japanese population.

Upon watching the film, I came to notice the theme of Human vs. Self where the community (human) vs. Godzilla (self) . Godzilla is a representation of the persona that humanity has created with the intention to be the better version of humanity and take over, in turn causing destruction.

This draws parallels with Mary Shelly’s Frankenstein where the monster becomes a product of its creator. In this case, Godzilla is the product of humanity and its desire to have control. It plays with the idea of humanity tampering with technologies beyond their power so much so that they create a monster.

Frankenstein

 

This is accentuated by the films nior and its black and white nature. Godzilla seems to come out from the shadows in certain scenes where the lighting techniques added to the dramatisation of the film.

Overall, I really enjoyed the film and how it played with certain themes, issues within Japanese culture and history as well as advancements in science and technology.

This film presented the fears, struggles and lives of Japanese people who were forced to live with the effects after the war and radioactivity. Thus, it provides a window for western audiences to view these struggles through the film.


Sources:

Honda, I 1954, ‘Godzilla’

Mambrol, N  2016, ‘New Historianism,’ Literary Theory and Criticism Notes <https://literariness.wordpress.com/2016/10/16/new-historicism/&gt;

Shelly, M 1818, ‘Frankenstein’

 

 

Social Media Mythbuster: Posting Times

For years, there has been this Instagram myth that if you post on Instagram at 8pm, you’re bound to receive the optimal amount of engagement.

The brand that I am testing this myth on requires that I post three times a day at 12, 5 and 8. Due to this restriction, there isn’t much leniency for me to test all times, so I tested times at 15 minute intervals.

I conducted research in the area to test if these were in fact he best times to post in Instagram. According to Instagram scheduling site, Later, the best time to post is outside of work hours.

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Social Media Mythbuster: Aesthetic

Instagram is a platform based within the premise of being a photo sharing network. Therefore, it is important to post content that is visually appealing. However, what’s visually appealing to some may not be visually appealing to others.

As a brand, social media sites like Instagram are the face of the company. For most followers, they will never met the people behind the brand, therefore, their only association with the brand is what they see online. As a result, consumers/ followers make up their mind about a brand based on what kind of content they see. This proves that the aesthetic of an Instagram profile as a whole has a huge impact on the perception of their consumers.

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Social Media Myth Busting and Cyborgology

As Mary Shelly stated in Frankenstein; “The instrument has taken control of its maker, the creation control of his creator.”

The blueprint of our society has now become dependent on social media. We find ourselves living simultaneously within the digital social media world as well as the physical world where Jean Baudrillard argues the absence of the original reality due to the takeover of the “instrument.”

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Social Media Mythbuster: Hashtags

Hashtags have become a staple for social media marketing. The first hashtag was coined by Chris Messina in 2007 where he proposed an idea that Twitter should start using hashtags to create groups online.

tweet chris.png
(Chris Messina’s Twitter account)

Since then, hashtags have become an integral element within the social media realms of Facebook and Instagram.

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