Using ‘I’ – an autoethnography

For as long as I can remember, I was always told that the story isn’t about me.

In high school, my teachers would time and time again remind us that using ‘I’ in an essay or short story was almost like shooting ourselves in the foot. We were told that using ‘I’ lessened the value of the work and that the pure focus should always be about the research and the content.

Now here I am, in my final semester at University and I am finally being told that using ‘I’ isn’t such as bad thing. According to Ellis, authoethnography allows the researcher to “analyse personal experiences to understand cultural experience.”

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Godzilla, a visualisation of Japan in 1954

When I think of Ishiro Honda’s 1954 film, Godzilla, I immediately visualise images of destroyed Japanese towns, a fire-breathing monster and terrified people. The classic combination for a Sci-Fi Horror film.

Before today, I hadn’t watched any of the films under the Godzilla umbrella because I wasn’t allowed to watch it.

Godzilla (1954)

Growing up as a young ethnic-Australian girl in the late 1990s, my parents  Italian/ South American parents were strict in regards to what we watched. At the time our television screens were filled with Japanese manga and cartoons with slight undertones of violence and destruction.  My mum banned my brother and I from ever watching shows and films like Godzilla or Japanese manga or cartoons because there was too much violence for impressionable young children.

After watching Gojira, i’m glad I didn’t watch the film when I was younger.

Through the lens of the New Historian Literary Theory, Godzilla was created as a product of the historic events which it was created in. If I was to have watched the film when I was younger, all I would have seen was scenes of destruction and over-dramatised acting. I wouldn’t have appreciated the history and underlying themes that capture the culture’s struggle surrounding the events that took place around WWII.

The film was different to what I had expected. It deeply explored the effects of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombs which ravaged the Japanese towns causing years of after effects, contamination and radiation. It also played on the social anxieties surrounding the U.S atomic bomb of Castle Bravo which detonated in 1954,  the same year Godzilla was released.

Godzilla itself was a motif for the unstoppable effects that the atomic bombs continued to have on the Japanese population.

Upon watching the film, I came to notice the theme of Human vs. Self where the community (human) vs. Godzilla (self) . Godzilla is a representation of the persona that humanity has created with the intention to be the better version of humanity and take over, in turn causing destruction.

This draws parallels with Mary Shelly’s Frankenstein where the monster becomes a product of its creator. In this case, Godzilla is the product of humanity and its desire to have control. It plays with the idea of humanity tampering with technologies beyond their power so much so that they create a monster.

Frankenstein

 

This is accentuated by the films nior and its black and white nature. Godzilla seems to come out from the shadows in certain scenes where the lighting techniques added to the dramatisation of the film.

Overall, I really enjoyed the film and how it played with certain themes, issues within Japanese culture and history as well as advancements in science and technology.

This film presented the fears, struggles and lives of Japanese people who were forced to live with the effects after the war and radioactivity. Thus, it provides a window for western audiences to view these struggles through the film.


Sources:

Honda, I 1954, ‘Godzilla’

Mambrol, N  2016, ‘New Historianism,’ Literary Theory and Criticism Notes <https://literariness.wordpress.com/2016/10/16/new-historicism/&gt;

Shelly, M 1818, ‘Frankenstein’

 

 

Brain Implants Case Study

Brain Implants have the capability to restore movement to the body by interrupting brain signals and replacing them with their own.

In 2015, Nathan Copeland was implanted with one of the first iterations of brain implants with four electrodes connected to his brain. In 2005, Copeland was paralysed in a car accident, however, this brain implants allowed him to regain feeling in his fingertips and control robotic arm using his brain.

The innovation of brain implants opens a new world of possibilities for people suffering from diseases and medical conditions.

 

Reference:

Kasulis K 2016 ‘Mind control brain implants are real don’t be scared they could do a lot of good,’ Mic Daily <https://mic.com/articles/177409/mind-control-brain-implants-are-real-dont-be-scared-they-could-do-a-lot-of-good#.VuBGPCE2d&gt;

Brain Implants and what it really means for society

Brain implants have been around for years with one of the first being the Cochlear Implant which improved hearing ability. In recent years, more and more medical devices have been toggling with the capabilities of brain implants to cure diseases, medical conditions and birth defects.

The Deep Brain Stimulator is a brain implant that has been rolled out within the last few years to cure diseases such as Parkinsons. It uses two electrodes connected to the brain that interrupt the synapse between nerves. This means that the implant is able to alter the information the brain receives in order to change the motion of the body. This is the first wave of invasive brain implants with the capability to control movement and interrupt normal bodily function.

Continue reading Brain Implants and what it really means for society

ANTHONY TAKATAKA X LOVE IS LOVE

Written by me on Dance Editorial

Dance Editorial

As a thirteen year old, Anthony Takataka, like many young teenage boys, would have rather played rugby league than dance. Anthony’s mum wanted him to dance for years but he couldn’t shake the ‘male dancer’ stereotype.

“One day my mum asked me again to try a hip hop class at Dorothy Cowie School of dancing, and for some strange reason I ended up going to it, 6 years later here I am, all about that live love dance life” he said.

In 2016, Anthony enrolled in Brent Street’s Fulltime Triple Threat course where he had the opportunity to learn from some amazing choreographers and dancers. However, he draws inspiration from choreographers David McLean, Cameron Mitchell and Marko Panzic.

“My favourite choreographer would have to be David McLean because every class I attend of his is never a disappointment,” he said.

“No matter how hype or deep the class is, I…

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